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Toronto links

 

University of Toronto

Centre for Medieval Studies

Department of History

Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures

Library

                                                                                                                                                          

Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies (The website has details on the various PIMS publications and monograph series; an index to their journal Mediaeval Studies; and info on current fellows and research projects and on their excellent library.)

 

The Bergendal Collection (The largest private collection of medieval manuscripts in North America – right here in Toronto!)

 

General medieval resources

 

PIMS links (Extremely useful collection of medieval, Latin, bible studies and palaeography/diplomatics/manuscript links.)

 

Mediaevum.de (Essential first stop for medieval German stuff, with some sections also available in English. Intended primarily for medieval Germanists and Latinists, but with a wide range of useful resources, including a large number of bibliographies, links to online dictionaries, and info on current research projects; also links to personal websites of many scholars and departmental sites of universities in Germany and elsewhere.)

 

The Medieval Academy of America (Speculum, links to their various book series, conference info, grad student mailing list etc.)

 

Monumenta Germaniae Historica (The German research institute: this website has complete details of all their current publications in all their series, as well as scanned image files of most of their volumes, and a link to their library.)

 

Digitised manuscript collection of the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek (The Bayerische Staatsbibliothek in Munich has one of the largest collections of medieval Latin manuscripts, and from this link you can browse and search their digitised manuscript collection – with plenty of medieval German, Greek, Hebrew and other languages represented as well as Latin.)

 

Bibliotheca Palatina Heidelberg (Digitised collection of all manuscript holdings of the Bibliotheca Palatina at the University of Heidelberg, one of the greatest collections of medieval German manuscripts, with excellent deposits also of Latin material.)

 

The Vatican archives (With an introduction to the study of diplomatics, a link to the Vatican’s school of palaeography and diplomatics, document downloads, lists of publications, history of the archives...)

 

The Vatican library (Closed for the next three years...)

 

The Online Reference Book for Medieval Studies (The ORB contains links, texts in translation, brief historical info, timelines, bibliographies… a good place to start web research, and fun to browse.)

 

WEMSK (What Every Medievalist Should Know; compiled by James Marchand for the ‘beginning-to-semi-advanced graduate student’; introductory bibliographic material on a very wide range of subjects.)

 

Medieval Sourcebook (Part of ORB, translated sources.)

 

Multilingual Bible (Searchable full text versions of the Vulgate, King James, Douai-Reims, Luther 1545; Luther 1912, and many other Bibles.)

 

Canadian Society of Medievalists (Florilegium, membership info, conference into etc.)

 

Medieval Institute at Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo! Publications, congress info, grad programmes, and more.)

 

Medieval Institute at Leeds (Hosts of the other major medieval congress.)

 

The Labyrinth (Dedicated search engine and resource site for all things medieval.)

 

Bibliotheca Augustana (Online texts, including materials in medieval Latin, Greek, German, English, all the Romance vernaculars, and Russian and Yiddish. Also has links to dictionaries and learning aids for some languages, including Latin.)

 

Oxford Text Archive (Hundreds of searchable full texts in Latin and various medieval vernaculars.)

 

Grotefend’s Zeitrechnung (Online version of Grotefend’s Zeitrechnung des Mittelalters und der Neuzeit: calendars, feast days, indictions, a Heiligenverzeichnis... but the most useful part of the online version is the Rechner: calculate, among other things, when Easter or a particular saint’s day fell in a given year.)

 

Orbis Latinus fully searchable (Linked to google maps, and also to the pdfs.)

 

Orbis Latinus (Latin geography; pdfs; a more easily searchable version is available here.)

 

TITUS (Thesaurus Indogermanischer Text- und Sprachmaterialien; bibliography; current research; directory of scholars, plenty of info on the languages and other miscellaneous stuff.)

 

Piccard online (A project to publish online in searchable form Gerhard Piccard’s collection of over 90,000 watermarks.)

 

Bibliographie zur Diplomatik (A bibliography of resources for medieval diplomatic for all regions, compiled by Prof. Thomas Frenz, including material on other auxiliary disciplines; sub-categorised in great detail by topic, so that, for example, under Allgemeines, you can find 25 entries just on the Arenga, or over 40 entries on wax tablets; includes material in a range of European languages, not just German.)

 

 

Medieval Latin (more on my Latin page)

 

Abbreviationes (Medieval Latin abbreviations online! 70,000 of them!!! But you have to buy the software…)

 

The Latin Library (Online texts, including a medieval section.)

 

Bibliographie faksimilierter Handschriften (From Uni-Graz.)

 

St. Gallen Manuscripts (100 complete manuscripts online from the library of St. Gallen Abbey in Switzerland.)

 

Oxford Text Archive (Hundreds of searchable full texts in Latin and various medieval vernaculars.)

 

CAMENA (Corpus Automatum Multiplex Electorum Neolatinitatis Auctorum: this has image files of a huge range of Neo-Latin texts, from poems to scientific works. Scanned image files means it’s a bit unwieldy, but a useful resource nonetheless, especially for the otherwise difficult-to-access reference works, some of which are linked below).

 

Thesaurus eruditionis (CAMENA’s index page for reference works; includes dictionaries on law, literature, politics, sciences, philosophy, magic, and a number of other subjects).

 

Du Cange online (All of Du Cange, made even more unwieldy by being in scanned image files – but convenient when you just have to check an obscure Latin word at midnight and all the libraries are closed).

 

Perseus (Essential web resource for all things Latin, albeit mainly for classicists. It has Lewis and Short. There are also useful materials for Renaissance scholars.)

 

Early medieval legal Latin (Glossary of legal terminology in early medieval Latin.)

 

Orbis Latinus (Latin geography; pdfs; a more easily searchable version is available here.)

 

Orbis Latinus fully searchable (Linked to google maps, and also to the pdfs.)

Glossarium diplomaticum… I and II (Eduard Brinckmeier’s dictionary of technical, legal, economic, diplomatic etc. vocabulary occuring in documentary sources; mainly Germanic dialects, but also quite a bit of Latin from German sources. Can be downloaded as very large pdfs.)

 

Monasterium.net (Online digital archive, with images of over 250,000 medieval documents, not exclusively from monastic archives, as well as links to digitisations of out-of-copyright printed editions; primarily useful for German-speaking Europe, but also including an increasing number of documents from central Europe, and digitised editions have an even wider geographical scope, even crossing the channel with, inter alia, DEEDS.)

 

 

Medieval and early modern German history

 

John Eldevik’s reference guide (A guide to research resources for medieval Germany, compiled for the GHI Washington by Eldevik in 2006; downloadable as a pdf file.)

 

German archives on the internet (A list of websites of German and other archives, maintained by the Archivschule in Marburg; these websites normally contain an overview of deposits in each archive, so are the best place to start looking for material and planning trips to Germany for archival research.)

 

Monumenta Germaniae Historica (The German research institute: this website has complete details of all their current publications in all their series, as well as scanned image files of most of their volumes, and a link to their library.)

 

Digitised manuscript collection of the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek (The Bayerische Staatsbibliothek in Munich has one of the largest collections of medieval Latin manuscripts, and from this link you can browse and search their digitised manuscript collection – with plenty of medieval German, Greek, Hebrew and other languages represented as well as Latin.)

 

Mõm-ca fonds (Links to the online archival deposits provided by monasterium.net; fonds normally include an introducton with a brief history of the deposit and high-quality images of individual charters, and also often references to editions etc.; over 250,000 medieval documents currently available.)

 

Bayerische Landesbibliothek online (Digitised sources for medieval Bavarian history: quite a large collection!)

 

Kaiserurkunden in Abbildungen (364 imperial diplomata from the whole of the medieval period; facsimiles and detailed notes. Very useful tool for the study of diplomatic, and the study of imperial acts. You need a plugin to view the images, but this can be downloaded from the same website.)

 

Medieval German Urkundenbücher (wikisource) (Useful list, with links to pdfs in many cases, of editions of primary-source collections for medieval and early modern Germany; see also here; not comprehensive, but particularly useful for sources available online.)

 

Medieval German Urkundenbücher (Frenz) (One of the resources on Frenz’s Bibliographie zur Diplomatik page, what appears to be a comprehensive list of published charter collections from around Europe, last updated 2013.)

 

Corpus der altdeutschen Originalurkunden (What it says: texts of the four main volumes, searchable.)

 

Glossarium diplomaticum… I and II (Eduard Brinckmeier’s dictionary of technical, legal, economic, diplomatic etc. vocabulary occuring in documentary sources; mainly Germanic dialects, but also quite a bit of Latin from German sources. Can be downloaded as very large pdfs.)

 

Historisch-geographisches Wörterbuch des deutschen Mittelalters (By Hermann Oesterley.)

 

Württembergisches Urkundenbuch (Searchable text.)

 

Zeitschriftenfreihandmagazin or the Magazine Stacks (Indexes of hundreds of periodicals, many quite obscure [and not all German!], with full tables of contents, as well as indexes to a number of Festschrifts, exhibition catalogues and dissertations [once again, not all German].)

 

Historische Hilfswissenschaften: Diplomatik (Links and resources for diplomatic, not just for Germany; not updated since 2009.)

 

Regesta-Imperii Literatursuche (Excellent free searchable database of medieval scholarship in all fields.)

 

Forschungsstelle für Personalschriften an der Philipps-Universität Marburg (Research project on early modern German funeral sermons, with a catalogue of over 150,000 sermons, a bibliography, and other useful material on funeral sermons.)

 

Braunschweiger Leichenpredigten (Info on funeral sermons in Braunschweig.)

 

Herzog August Bibliothek (This library contains one of the best German collections of medieval manuscripts and early printed books; it also provides stipends for researchers. The website also has links to a number of bibliographic and research tools, including a database of over 14,000 funeral sermons in the library’s holdings, and a bibliography of research on early modern history.)

 

Medieval accounts (Bibliography and information page in German on medieval and early modern account books.)

 

Regesta Imperii (Charters of the medieval Holy Roman Emperors online.)

 

Indices to early medieval legal texts (Word indices to the various barbarian leges, and the Merovingian concilia and diplomata; downloadable pdf files.)

 

 

Medieval history

 

Basic bibliography for medieval history (From Columbia University; useful bibliography, links to plenty of other resources.)

 

Grotefend’s Zeitrechnung (Online version of Grotefend’s Zeitrechnung des Mittelalters und der Neuzeit: calendars, feast days, indictions, a Heiligenverzeichnis... but the most useful part of the online version is the Rechner: calculate, among other things, when Easter or a particular saint’s day fell in a given year.)

 

The history e-book project (Modern scholarship online, fully searchable and free; this includes a large medieval history section.

 

Zeitschriftenfreihandmagazin or the Magazine Stacks (Indexes of hundreds of periodicals, many quite obscure [and not all German!], with full tables of contents, as well as indexes to a number of Festschrifts, exhibition catalogues and dissertations [once again, not all German].)

 

Regesta-Imperii Literatursuche (Excellent free searchable database of medieval scholarship in all fields.)

 

John Munro’s website (Prof. Munro taught economic history at the U of T for many years, and his website has a great collection of vast bibliographies on medieval and early modern economic history.)

 

Oliver Volckart’s bibliographies (Volckart teaches economic history at Humboldt in Berlin; this page has links to extensive bibliographies, mainly, but not exclusively in German.)

 

Medieval prices data-bank (Currency and commodity prices for medieval and early modern Europe, with a review of the site here.)

 

German Historical Institute Washington (Mainly useful for modern history, but they also sponsor a medieval history seminar, and have some resources for scholars and students interested in medieval German history.)

 

Deutsches Historisches Institut Roma (Links to their journals and publications, and info on their stipends to study in Italy; plenty of useful stuff for medievalists and church historians.)

 

Deutsches Historisches Institut Paris (Links to their journals and publications; some useful stuff for medievalists and church historians.)

 

Centre for Medieval Studies, Bergen (Major research institution for Norse, medieval Latin and Scandinavian history.)

 

Bibliography for Anglo-Saxon history (Compiled by Simon Keynes; very comprehensive.)

 

Bibliography for Carolingian history (Compiled by Thomas Noble; very comprehensive.)

 

Bibliography for Gregory of Tours (Compiled by Allen E. Jones; very comprehensive.)

 

The 14th-century crisis (Bibliography compiled by Otto Volk; quite comprehensive, but mainly German-focussed.)

 

Jews in the middle ages (Compiled by Christoph Cluse.)

 

Medieval accounts (Bibliography and information page in German on medieval and early modern account books.)

 

Deutsche Inschriften online (German medieval and early modern epigraphy.)

 

Ad fontes (Online tutorial on working in archives, including basics of diplomatics, palaeography etc.)

 

Norhist (Searchable database [in Norwegian] of articles on Norwegian history.)

 

Frauenklöster (Resources on religious communities of women in the middle ages.)

 

Regesta Imperii (Charters of the medieval Holy Roman Emperors online.)

 

Indices to early medieval legal texts (Word indices to the various barbarian leges, and the Merovingian concilia and diplomata; downloadable pdf files.)

 

Historische Hilfswissenschaften Uni-München (Their links to pages with more links and resources for the various auxiliary disciplines; includes pages on heraldry, diplomatics, text editing, and palaeography. Their own pages are in German, but the resources are in many languages, including English.)

 

Institut für Realienkunde des Mittelalters und der frühen Neuzeit (Material culture in the middle ages.)

 

 

Resources for medieval German languages and literature

 

Bibliotheca Palatina Heidelberg (Digitised collection of all manuscript holdings of the Bibliotheca Palatina at the University of Heidelberg, one of the greatest collections of medieval German manuscripts, with excellent deposits also of Latin material.)

 

Gerhard Köbler’s linguistic resources (pdf and html files of a number of dictionaries, especially of legal language, including Old High German, Old Saxon, Latin, Old Frisian.)

 

Middle High German dictionaries (Online versions of the standard dictionaries by Benecke-Müller-Zarncke and Lexer.)

 

Regional German dictionaries (Also of some use for medieval vocabulary.)

 

Handschriftencensus (Listings of the manuscript transmission, with current shelf marks and descriptions of mss, of German texts from the middle ages: an invaluable resource.)

 

Old High German dictionary (By Gerhard Köbler; pdf files. Useful because it provides, where possible the Latin words glossed by the OHG.)

 

sagemære (Alexander Sager’s online audiobooks of medieval German literature, including the Hildebrandslied, Heliand, as well as a number of MHG texts.)

 

Mediaevum.de ((Essential first stop for medieval German stuff, with some sections also available in English. Intended primarily for medieval Germanists and Latinists, but with a wide range of useful resources, including a large number of bibliographies, links to online dictionaries, and info on current research projects; also links to personal websites of many scholars and departmental sites of universities in Germany and elsewhere. The site also has job searches for Germanists, medieval German texts and links to texts, and study aids for MHG etc.)

 

Glossarium diplomaticum… I and II (Eduard Brinckmeier’s dictionary of technical, legal, economic, diplomatic etc. vocabulary occuring in documentary sources; mainly Germanic dialects, but also quite a bit of Latin from German sources. Can be downloaded as very large pdfs.)

 

Historisch-geographisches Wörterbuch des deutschen Mittelalters (By Hermann Oesterley.)

 

Medieval German in Toronto (= Markus Stock.)

 

Altgermanisches Freihandmagazin (TOCs of journals for Altgermanistik; not as extensive for this field as the Erlangen site [see above], but still very useful. Check the Erlangen site for the many articles published in journals listed there, but not here.)

 

TITUS (Thesaurus Indogermanischer Text- und Sprachmaterialien; bibliography; current research; directory of scholars, plenty of info on the languages and other miscellaneous stuff.)

 

Germanic linguistics and texts (Some info on the older Germanic languages, runic texts, and texts in MHG, OHG and OE.)

 

Bibliography for Gottfried’s Tristan (Compiled by Christoph Huber; VERY comprehensive.)

 

Bibliography for Hartmann’s Gregorius (up to 1997; compiled by Tobias Kemper.)

 

Bibliography on Berthold von Regensburg and his epoch (By Nadja Nitsche and Michael Dobstadt; annotated, and very useful starting point for research on Berthold, and on German sermons.)

 

Bibliography on Jans der Enikel (Late medieval chronicler; compiled by Graeme Dunphy.)

 

Medieval German Dawn-Songs (Fairly comprehensive bibliography compiled by Joachim Hamm.)

 

Late Minnesang bibliography (Large pdf file of 65 pages! Goes up to 2003; compiled by T Horn, A Sczesny, and M Syring.)

 

Bibliography on German Alexander literature (Compiled by Ralf Schlechtweg-Jahn; up to 2000.)

 

Bibliography on medieval German charms and magic (Compiled by Harald Saller.)

 

 

Old Norse

 

Netútgáfan (Old Norse texts, including all of Heimskringla, a number of the Sagas of Icelanders, Snorra Edda, Fornaldarsögur.)

 

ASNC resources (Grammar and pronunciation aids for Norse and other languages at the Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic at Cambridge; the website also has other useful stuff.)

 

Zoëga (ON Dictionary online; TIFF files, so not very easy to use.)

 

Cleasby-Vigfusson (The comprehensive ON dictionary online; also image files and not easy to use.)

 

Alaric Hall’s Magic Sheet (‘Everything you need to know about Old Norse grammar, on one side of A4’; the link leads you to all the other resources he offers as well.)

 

Northvegr (Resources and articles on all things Nordic; some material can be useful, but in general the site should be handled with care.)

 

Society for the Advancement of Scandinavian Studies (With links to the journal; conference info; prizes; links to various institutions and other resources.)

 

Stofnun Árna Magnússonar (Árni Magnússon Institute; links to many things, including a digital manuscript collection of many of the most important ON texts.)

 

Viking Society for Northern Research (Membership info, lists of publications, link to the Saga-Book.)

 

Viking society publications (pdfs of most of their publications; free downloads.)

 

Saganet (Digital manuscript collection of ON texts.)

 

Septentrionalia.net (Devoted to pdf-digitisation of the Lexicon poeticum and a bunch of other texts and scholarship; full text pdfs of, among other things, Finnur Jónsson’s Skjaldedigtning, his eds of Morkinsskinna and Heimskringla; also has Sievers’ Heliand… and more to come!)

 

TITUS (Thesaurus Indogermanischer Text- und Sprachmaterialien; bibliography; current research; directory of scholars, plenty of info on the languages and other miscellaneous stuff.)

 

BONIS (Bibliography of Old Norse-Icelandic Studies; selective but useful and wide-ranging.)

 

Proverbs in the sagas (A concordance by Richard Harris.)

 

 

Other stuff I like

 

London Review of Books (A treasure for the thinking person.)

 

Dictionaries! (A list of all kinds of dictionaries for all sorts of languages, with, in many cases, links to them online.)

 

Viola.com (The viola website: viola resources, links, mailing list. Alas, I am no longer a serious violist; I wish I were…)

 

Bach cd reviews (Searchable database of reviews of recordings of almost all of Johann Sebastian Bach’s music that has been recorded.)

 

Another Bach website (Though it calls itself Bach cantatas, it is very useful for reviews and discussion of recordings and contemporary performers of his works much more broadly.)

 

James Kippen’s website (Kippen teaches ethnomusicology at U of T; he studied tabla in Lucknow and wrote an excellent book on the subject about 20 years ago, and his website has a huge collection of clips from rare archival recordings of all the greats. He also has other resources, including some of his articles.)

 

Jeremy and Vinita’s Montreal Food Guide (Hundreds of restaurants reviewed.)

 

WIMA (The Werner Icking Music Archive: set up by the late and much-lamented Werner Icking, this site has sheet music in pdf files, in often exemplary editions by Icking himself, and free! Hundreds of composers represented.)

 

IMSLP (The International Music Score Library Project; out-of-copyright editions of thousands of scores scanned in, downloadable for free. Some of the editions are a bit dodgy, though.)

 

inpassing.org (by Eve S. Dropper; things heard, or seen, in passing – often very amusing, and sometimes thought-provoking.)

 

ZVAB (German antiquarian booksellers – like a German version of ABE. The pages are available in English too, if you want to search for things like MGH volumes that may be easier available in Germany, but you have no German yourself.)

 

Buchhandel.de (German books in print.)

 

The Jargon File (Also known as the New Hacker Dictionary.)

 

Viola jokes (Also has other music jokes.)